Tag Archives: ipsec

Using different pre-shared keys for Azure virtual network tunnels

I get loads of questions on Azure networking, some of them are good and others are just a lack of the will to RTFM. But this one actually had me trying it out cause I wasn’t sure of the possibility.

The question was: Can you have different pre-shared keys on the tunnels in Azure?

Looking around I found lots of examples of multiple tunnels, but all with the same PSK (Pre-Shared Key).

No better way than trying then, is there?

The setup is three different virtual networks:

A-net, B-net and C-net.

01-virtual-networks

There is four different local networks. A local network is a definition of the address range and gateway address that you use to connect a vnet to.

We’ve got:

A-BC-local (connecting A to B with multihop-routing to C)
A-net-local (connecting B to A)
C-AB-local (connecting C to B with multihop-routing to A)
C-net-local (connecting B to C)

So it’s A – B – C if you didn’t figure that out 🙂
02-local-networks

A connected to A-BC-local.

03-anet

B connected to both A and C.

04-bnet

C connected to B.

05-cnet

When they’re all configured they won’t connect since the newly created gateways have automatically set PSK’s. You’ll need to use PowerShell to set the PSK for each tunnel.

 

Set-Azurevnetgatewaykey -vnet A-net -localnetworksitename A-BC-local -sharedkey 456
Set-AzureVnetGatewayKey -vnet B-net -localnetworksitename A-net-local -sharedkey 456
Set-Azurevnetgatewaykey -vnet B-net -localnetworksitename C-net-local -sharedkey 123
Set-azurenvetgatewaykey -vnet C-net -localnetworksitename C-AB-local -sharedkey 123

This will set the tunnel from a-b to 456 on both a-gw and b-gw. B to C will have 123.

Then connect the networks using

Set-AzureVnetGateway -vnet A-net -localnetworksitename A-BC-local -connect
Set-AzureVnetGateway -vnet C-net -localnetworksitename C-AB-local -connect

Conclusion: You can set your own PSK for each tunnel, no matter if it’s to on-premises or between networks in Azure.

Connecting to your Azure site-to-site VPN over NAT

Creating a site-to-site connection to your Azure virtual network is desired in a lot of scenarios. Think hybrid cloud, new workloads, communicating with internal systems from Azure and so on. And in demo scenarios when you’re out travelling you might need that access too. Well, looking at the list of supported devices (below) we can find Windows RRAS for example.

Supported VPN devices: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/jj156075.aspx

And reading the guide (below) we’ll see how it’s actually done.

Configure Site-to-site VPN: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/dn133795.aspx

According to the last link you’ll need an external IPv4 that’s not behind NAT: “Obtain an externally facing IPv4 IP for your VPN device. This IP address is required for a site-to-site configuration and is used for your VPN device, which cannot be located behind a NAT.

That last statement has been discussed quite a lot, and when you read the RFC (RFC 3715, http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3715)  of course that IPsec connection will work over NAT. It’s just not supported by Microsoft, meaning that we can’t help you configuring your firewall to allow passthrough, hence we want your gateway to be directly connected to the internet.

For IPsec to traverse your NAT you’ll need to forward some ports (often called port forwarding in your router).

IKE – UDP 500
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) – IP protocol 50
Authentication Header (AH) – IP protocol 51
IPsec NAT traversal – UDP 4500

My setup consists of a Telia router with an external IP of 78.72.172.xx, my internal ip range is 192.168.1.0/24. This is added as a local network in Azure.

azure_local2

I then create a new virtual network in Azure and create a dynamic gateway. This will be assigned an ip address.

azure_vnet_disconnected

After that I’ve installed a VM on my local network running Windows Server 2012 R2 and configured it with RRAS. If you download the VPN device configuration script from the Azure portal it’ll set everything up for you, including installing the role. I’ve also configured the port forwarding in my router.

portforward

 

As you can see in the screenshot above the rule “IPSEC_500” forwards all traffic to 192.168.1.150.

Once you have your port forwarding up and running you can have your RRAS server connect.

rras_connected

Give the portal some time (or refresh it) and it’ll show connected too

azure_vnet_connected

I’ve deployed two VM’s in Azure and turned off the firewall to be able to verify connectivity using ping.

 

connected

 

In the screenshot above I’ve verified connectivity to 10.0.0.5 in Azure with ping, and I’ve done a traceroute. The timeout is from the Azure gateway that doesn’t respond to ICMP. Internal address of RRAS server can be seen in the lower window.

Note that this is unsupported by Microsoft – but works according to RFC.