Register resource providers in Azure

These lines of PowerShell will help you register ALL resource providers in Azure in the selected subscription:

# Login
Add-AzureRmAccount

# List subscriptions
Get-AzureSubscription

# Select subscription
Select-AzureSubscription -SubscriptionName “INSERT NAME HERE”

# List all providers and register (if you only want specific ones, you must run commands manually)
$providers = @(Get-AzureRmResourceProvider -ListAvailable)
foreach ($x in $providers) {

Register-AzureRmResourceProvider -ProviderNamespace $x.ProviderNamespace -Force
write-host $x.ProviderNamespace
}
Write-Host “Done!”

Creating a VPN gateway in Azure ARM using PowerShell

Spent a few days at a customer site building stuff. Needed some gateways in ARM (Azure Resource Manager) mode. The code below will create a gateway and all artifacts it depends upon.
Use at your own risk 🙂
# Start here
Login-AzureRmAccount
# Variables
$location01 = “West Europe”
$networkname01 = “AzNet”
$rgname01 = “AzNetRG”
# Azure Network Address Space (/27 for VM use. /29 for gateway use)
# Your Azure network MUST have a subnet named “GatewaySubnet”
# Create your network in the portal, make sure to add all address spaces and subnets before running script. Do NOT forget to add “GatewaySubnet”.
$localSubnets01 = @(“10.1.0.0/27”, “10.1.2.0/29”)
# Remote Network Address Space
$remotenetwork01 = @(“192.168.1.0/24”)
# Remote Network Gateway IP
$RemoteGwIP01 = “8.8.8.8”
# Remote Connection Gateway Name
$RemoteConnectionGwName = “RemGW”
# Remote Connection Name
$RemoteConnectionName = “RemConn”
$VNET01 = Get-AzureRMVirtualNetwork -Name $networkname01 -ResourceGroupName $rgname01
$gwSubnet01 = Get-AzureRMVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -Name GatewaySubnet -VirtualNetwork $VNET01
# Create a new public IP address.
$gwIP01 = New-AzurermPublicIpAddress -Name ($networkname01 + “-gwip”) -ResourceGroupName $rgname01 -Location $location01 -AllocationMethod Dynamic
# Create VPN gateway configuration.
$gwConfig01 = New-AzurermVirtualNetworkGatewayIpConfig -Name ($RemoteConnectionName + “-gwconfig”) -SubnetId (Get-AzurermVirtualNetworkSubnetConfig -VirtualNetwork $VNET01 -Name GatewaySubnet).Id -PublicIpAddressId $gwIP01.Id
# Create gateway. This will take up to 40 minutes, so be patient.
$gw01 = New-AzurermVirtualNetworkGateway -Name ($networkname01 + “-gw”) -ResourceGroupName $rgname01 -Location $location01 -IpConfigurations $gwConfig01 -GatewayType VPN -VpnType RouteBased -Tag $tags
$localGw01 = New-AzurermLocalNetworkGateway -Name $RemoteConnectionGwName -ResourceGroupName $rgname01 -Location $location01 -GatewayIpAddress $RemoteGwIP01 -AddressPrefix $remotenetwork01
$AzureGW = Get-AzureRmVirtualNetworkGateway -Name ($networkname01 + “-gw”)  -ResourceGroupName $rgname01
$RemoteGW = Get-AzurermLocalNetworkGateway -Name $RemoteConnectionGwName -ResourceGroupName $rgname01
New-AzurermVirtualNetworkGatewayConnection -Name $RemoteConnectionName -ResourceGroupName $rgname01 -Location $location01 -VirtualNetworkGateway1 $AzureGW -LocalNetworkGateway2 $RemoteGW -ConnectionType IPsec -RoutingWeight 10 -SharedKey $sharedKey01
# End here

TechDays 2015 – Pre-conf and Azure Resource Manager

Just got an email confirming mine and Anders Bengtssons pre-conf for TechDays 2015, the “Azure IAAS Ninja Bootcamp”. We’ll teach you as much as you can consume about Azure IAAS during one day! I also got one session on Azure Resource Manager. ARM is by far the biggest leap in producing clean, nicely installed and repetitive environments in Azure. If you’re missing out on PowerShell and ARM along with DSC my guess is that you’ll be doing something else in the future!

Are you going to TechDays 2015 in Sweden?

Check out my sessions here: http://tdswe.kistamassan.se/Program-2015/Talare/(filter)/J

And don’t forget to register: http://tdswe.kistamassan.se/Anmal-dig

Compare installed vs available Microsoft Azure PowerShell versions

When running Microsoft Azure PowerShell certain cmdlets and functions are only available in the latest version of Azure PowerShell. So how do you know if you have the latest version? Well, this snippet will check your currently installed version and then ask the Web Platform Installer for the available version. It’ll then display the version numbers, letting you know if you’re current or not.

Just paste the entire code snippet into your PowerShell-prompt or embed it and just call the function.

— Begin snippet —

function Get-WindowsAzurePowerShellVersion
{
[CmdletBinding()]
Param ()

## - CHECK INSTALLED VERSION
Write-Host "`r`nInstalled version: " -ForegroundColor 'Yellow';
(Get-Module -name "Azure" | Where-Object{ $_.Name -eq 'Azure' }) `
| Select Version, Name, Author | Format-List;

## - CHECK WEB PI FOR AVAILABLE VERSION
Write-Host "Available version: " -ForegroundColor 'Green';
[reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.Web.PlatformInstaller") | Out-Null;
$ProductManager = New-Object Microsoft.Web.PlatformInstaller.ProductManager;
$ProductManager.Load(); $ProductManager.Products `
| Where-object{
($_.Title -like "Microsoft Azure Powershell*") `
-and ($_.Author -eq 'Microsoft Corporation')
} `
| Select-Object Version, Title, Published, Author | Format-List;
};
Get-WindowsAzurePowerShellVersion

— End of snippet —

Azure PowerShell

SWE: Missa inte Azure pre-conf på TechDays 2015!

Missade du min och Anders Bengtssons fyradagars Azure-workshop? Nu kan du gå en heldag i samband med TechDays där vi har kokat ner fyra dagar till en heldag fylld med ytterst lite teori och väldigt mycket labbar. Kan du redan allt om Azure finns det fler ämnen att fokusera på, t.ex. EMS, Office365 eller Datacenter.

Läs mer på http://tdswe.kistamassan.se/Program-2015/Pre-Conf

 

Using different pre-shared keys for Azure virtual network tunnels

I get loads of questions on Azure networking, some of them are good and others are just a lack of the will to RTFM. But this one actually had me trying it out cause I wasn’t sure of the possibility.

The question was: Can you have different pre-shared keys on the tunnels in Azure?

Looking around I found lots of examples of multiple tunnels, but all with the same PSK (Pre-Shared Key).

No better way than trying then, is there?

The setup is three different virtual networks:

A-net, B-net and C-net.

01-virtual-networks

There is four different local networks. A local network is a definition of the address range and gateway address that you use to connect a vnet to.

We’ve got:

A-BC-local (connecting A to B with multihop-routing to C)
A-net-local (connecting B to A)
C-AB-local (connecting C to B with multihop-routing to A)
C-net-local (connecting B to C)

So it’s A – B – C if you didn’t figure that out 🙂
02-local-networks

A connected to A-BC-local.

03-anet

B connected to both A and C.

04-bnet

C connected to B.

05-cnet

When they’re all configured they won’t connect since the newly created gateways have automatically set PSK’s. You’ll need to use PowerShell to set the PSK for each tunnel.

 

Set-Azurevnetgatewaykey -vnet A-net -localnetworksitename A-BC-local -sharedkey 456
Set-AzureVnetGatewayKey -vnet B-net -localnetworksitename A-net-local -sharedkey 456
Set-Azurevnetgatewaykey -vnet B-net -localnetworksitename C-net-local -sharedkey 123
Set-azurenvetgatewaykey -vnet C-net -localnetworksitename C-AB-local -sharedkey 123

This will set the tunnel from a-b to 456 on both a-gw and b-gw. B to C will have 123.

Then connect the networks using

Set-AzureVnetGateway -vnet A-net -localnetworksitename A-BC-local -connect
Set-AzureVnetGateway -vnet C-net -localnetworksitename C-AB-local -connect

Conclusion: You can set your own PSK for each tunnel, no matter if it’s to on-premises or between networks in Azure.

Sometimes IT works